TLM-based Electromagnetic Simulation



by Prof. Christos Christopoulos, PhD., Fellow IEEE, Fellow REng
Emeritus Professor of Electrical Engineering
University of Nottingham, UK
E-mail: christos.christopoulos@nottingham.ac.uk

TLM is a numerical modelling method for simulating electromagnetic (EM) systems in the discrete time-domain. It is suitable for modelling lumped networks, distributed networks or full-field EM problems. The essence of the technique is the construction of circuit analogues which are then solved exactly using available network solution methods. The resulting models are unconditionally stable, accurate and physically transparent thus aiding physical understanding and creative design by the user. The presentation will cover the essential features of the technique illustrated by examples for modelling complex lumped circuits and EM fields in three dimensions.

Biography: Christos CHRISTOPOULOS was born in Patras, Greece in 1946. He received the Diploma in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering from the National Technical University of Athens in 1969 and the MSc and DPhil from the University of Sussex in 1970 and 1974 respectively.

In 1974 he joined the Arc Research Project of the University of Liverpool and spent two years working on vacuum arcs and breakdown while on attachments at the UKAEA Culham Laboratory. In 1976 he joined the University of Durham as a Senior Demonstrator in Electrical Engineering Science. In October 1978 he joined the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Nottingham, was promoted to Professor of Electrical Engineering in 1990 and became the Director of the George Green Institute for Electromagnetics Research (GGIEMR) in 2001. He is now Emeritus Professor of Electrical Engineering.

His research interests are in Computational Electromagnetics, Electromagnetic Compatibility, Signal Integrity, Protection and Simulation of Power Networks, and Electrical Discharges and Plasmas. He is the author of over 400 research publications, eight books and several book chapters.

He has received the Electronics Letters and the Snell Premiums from the IEE and several conference best paper awards. He is a member of the IET, and an IEEE Fellow. He is past Executive Team Chairman of the IEE Professional Network in EMC, member of the CIGRE Working Group 36.04 on EMC and Associate Editor of the IEEE EMC Transactions. He served as Chairman of URSI Commission E “Noise and Interference” in the period 2008-2011. In 2011 he received the IET Ambrose Fleming Medal for Achievement in Information and Communications. He is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering (FREng).